Health Voices

Health Voices – Journal of the Consumers Health Forum of Australia is published by CHF two times a year to promote debate on health care issues affecting all Australians and of interest to health consumers, government and industry.   ISSN 1835-5862 (Print)   ISSN 1835-8810 (Online)

Health Voices Releases


external http link icon Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015
27 April 2015
PHNs - will they be good for our health?
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2014
31 October 2014
eHealth: the future is now
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 14, April 2014
15 April 2014
Better bang for your buck
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 13, October 2013
21 October 2013
Primary care at the turning point
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 12, April 2013
21 April 2013
Health Voices - Australian healthcare — out of pocket and out of date?
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 11, November 2012
19 November 2012
Health Voices - Complementary Medicines: How well do consumers know their products?
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 10, May 2012
1 May 2012
Health Voices - Putting money where the mouth is: solutions for Australia's dental crisis
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 9, October 2011
26 October 2011
This edition looks at Medicines in Australia: Regulation, safety and access.
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 8, June 2011
30 June 2011
This issue of Health Voices explored the role of consumers in healthcare planning and delivery, and the value consumers bring to the decision-making table.
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 7, November 2010
1 November 2010
This edition presents a diversity of perspectives and timely discussion on moving forward in the critical area of eHealth.
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 6, April 2010
20 April 2010
A timely issue, with consumers sharing views on health funding and reform, and maintaining a sustainable health system
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 5, October 2009
12 November 2009
Consumer voices on depression, anxiety and chronic conditions - a collaborative edition with beyondblue: the national depression initiative.
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 4, March 2009
1 September 2008
This issue of Health Voices focuses on health care for children and young people.
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 3, December 2008
1 September 2008
Health Voices is published three times a year. Each issue has a theme that promotes debate on issues of interest to health consumers, government and industry.
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 2, July 2008
1 September 2008
Health Voices is published three times a year. Each issue has a theme that promotes debate on issues of interest to health consumers, government and industry.
 
pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 1, April 2008
1 August 2007
Each issue of Health Voices has a theme that promotes debate on issues of interest to health consumers, government and industry. This issue raises some of the ethical issues that exist in Australia today for health consumers.
 


Health Voices Individual Articles



Total number of Items: 195

Order by: Title Author Source 
Show only: CHF workshops Care in the community Electronic health information
  Equity in health Consumer participation Improving health and wellbeing
  Health funding Health professionals Information and communication
  Older people Honours and memorials Improving hospitals & health services
  Regulatory issues Research and new technologies Medicines and medical devices
  All   Privacy & personal health information

Title:pdf document icon Private sector has role in primary health but not to fund what Medicare does
Author:Dwayne Crombie
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015 , 27 April 2015
Abstract:Bupa is passionate about making a real difference to health because we know that good health is essential to thriving communities.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:external http link icon Shaping our regional primary health networks: what comes next?
Author:Di O'Halloran
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015 , 27 April 2015
Abstract:What will our future Primary Health Networks look like? By the time you read this edition of Health Voices, the outcomes of the PHN tender process will be in the public domain, signalling the beginning of what may well be a significant change in the nature of regional primary health organisations: a role currently filled by Medicare Locals (MLs).
Topic:Health funding / Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumer-focused commissioning
Author:Paresh Dawda and Angelene True
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015 , 27 April 2015
Abstract:In Australia, Primary Health Networks (PHNs) will have commissioning as its core function from July 2015. PHN objectives will be to improve coordination of care to ensure patients receive the right care in the right place at the right time and increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of medical services for consumers.
Topic:Health funding / Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumer and community engagement in Primary Health Networks
Author:Stephen Duckett
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015 , 27 April 2015
Abstract:There are two key documents which have shaped the design and implementation of the new Primary Health Networks (PHNs) — the Horvath report and the documents associated with the Invitation to Apply (ITA) for funding as a PHN.
Topic:Consumer participation / Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Healthy engagement
Author:Deb Dutton
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015 , 27 April 2015
Abstract:An organisation that promotes consumer involvement in the design and delivery of services must embed participation, meaningfully, at all levels.
Topic:Consumer participation / Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon The value of partnership and collaboration in primary health
Author:Helen Keleher
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015 , 27 April 2015
Abstract:Partnerships between health professionals, across sectors and including consumers strengthen the capacity of health service providers to improve health status and reduce health risks.
Topic:Consumer participation / Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Primary Health Networks — a new home for patient safety in Primary Care?
Author:Meredith Makeham
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015 , 27 April 2015
Abstract:As the time approaches for the establishment of Primary Health Networks, we have a new opportunity to reflect on how they might best achieve their key objectives: increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of medical services for patients, in particular those at risk of poor health outcomes; and improving coordination of care to ensure patients receive the right care in the right place at the right time.
Topic:Consumer participation / Health funding / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumers integral to health system planning
Author:Lyn Morgain
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015 , 27 April 2015
Abstract:The establishment of the new Primary Health Networks (PHNs) which will replace the Medicare Locals provide an important opportunity to consider the role of consumers in shaping the scope and approach of these new entities.
Topic:Improving hospitals and health services / Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Primary Health Networks: will they bring reform?
Author:Lesley M Russell
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015 , 27 April 2015
Abstract:Will the new Primary Health Networks (PHNs) that replace Medicare Locals (MLs) on 1 July 2015 counter this current trend and help strengthen primary care?
Topic:Equity in health / Health funding / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon We now enter ‘very uncertain terrain’
Author:Richard Di Natale
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015, 27 April 2015
Abstract:There remains a high level of concern among health professionals, practitioners and consumer representatives that the PHN will actually deliver a reduced and inferior service than Medicare Locals.
Topic:Equity in health / Health funding / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Primary Health Networks need GPs at core to improve patient outcomes
Author:Dr Frank R Jones
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015 , 27 April 2015
Abstract:A change of government inevitably results in significant reforms to key health policies and as GPs we need to help our patients benefit from new frameworks, while also ensuring governments are held to account to deliver what was promised.
Topic:Consumer participation / Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon After Medicare Locals, PHNs face twice the challenge
Author:Catherine King
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015 , 27 April 2015
Abstract:With fewer than half the number of their predecessor, PHNs already have twice the challenge ahead of them to achieve this and with $200 million already spent to downsize them and change their identity it’s hard to see how they can fill the health gaps created by this ill-considered decision to abolish Medicare Locals.
Topic:Consumer participation / Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon PHNs offer a vital foundation to a healthier future
Author:Sussan Ley
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015 , 27 April 2015
Abstract:The Australian Government is taking up the review’s suggestion for a new network of local bodies to guide primary health care. Unlike Medicare Locals, the new Primary Health Networks (PHNs) will be aligned with existing Local Hospital Networks, with the flexibility to suit local needs.
Topic:Health funding / Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Will PHNs have the right answer for the right care and how will we know?
Author:Alison Marcus
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015 , 27 April 2015
Abstract:When I see the key objectives of the PHNs are to increase effectiveness of medical services for patients, particularly those at risk of poor health, and to ensure “right care at right place and right time” I do wonder what magic the PHN architects have in store.
Topic:Consumer participation / Health funding / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon PHNs can be gamechangers if consumers are in the team
Author:Leanne Wells
Source:Health Voices, Issue 16, April 2015 , 27 April 2015
Abstract:CHF is devoting this issue of Health Voices to PHNs because, like it or not, these entities are the next big thing in primary health care and, not least, because of the lack of knowledge, let alone debate, about the future of localised, coordinated health care.
Topic:Health funding / Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Should We Stripmine Your eHealth Data
Author:Bruce Baer Arnold and Wendy Bonython
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2014, 18p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:The development of eHealth in Australia is raising the issue of just who owns the data generated by population-wide health systems. Should Australia be moving towards sale to drug companies, insurers and other businesses of wholeof-population health data,
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon What's needed to put eHealth on track
Author:Peter Brown
Source:Helath Voices, Issue 15, October 2014, 24p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:To reach full potential, modern medicine requires individually integrated care and coordinated services provided through safe and secure communication systems. Unfortunately, there is no such widespread, usable infrastructure in Australia.
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumers can control their health and privacy - through eHealth
Author:Emaa Hossack
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2014, 21p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:Eight years ago I asked the question “How can a shared record be privacy compliant?” The answer surprised me. Research and direct experience with implementations of shared records in communities around Australia, demonstrated that without electronic records it is very difficult for consumers to manage their health information — let alone be in control of who sees what, where and why. The flow of relevant health information improves co-ordination of care and outcomes
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon eHealth - growing pains on the journey to digital maturity
Author:Lisa Pettigrew
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2014 17p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:eHealth has become synonymous with health. So closely tied is the use of technology to the delivery of healthcare services, that to consider eHealth separately is outdated. However, along with most other industries, eHealth is experiencing growing pains as it reaches towards digital adulthood.
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon Great expectations - now we need the will
Author:Mary Potter
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2014, 14p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:The electronic management of health information started out with high hopes by consumers, particularly those with chronic conditions and the elderly. It was to revolutionise healthcare. Just where are those hopes now?
Topic:Health professionals
 
Title:pdf document icon Geraldine Robertson
Author:Bringing diagnostics reports into the eHealth record
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2014, 20p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:Most Australians will understand just how important it is for diagnostic imaging and pathology results to be easily accessible in any eHealth scheme.
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon How we can end the disconnect in eHealth
Author:Shane Solomon
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2014, 23p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:Telstra Health was established in April 2013 and officially launched in October this year, outlining its ambition to become Australia’s leading provider of integrated eHealth solutions. During that time one of the most common questions I get asked is ‘why does Telstra want to get involved in healthcare?’
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon Making a difference in the NT by ensuring important health information follows the patient
Author:Robert Whitehead
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2014, 15p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:My eHealth Record, the Northern Territory’s pioneering eHealth system has been in use for over nine years. The beginnings of My eHealth Record can be traced to 2002 and the development of a shared electronic health record in the Northern Territory as part of the Australian Government HealthConnect Trial.
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon Overcoming the tyranny of distance
Author:Marg Brown & Lesley Reiley
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2014 9p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:The views of two consumers living in rural Australia.
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon Why I love eHealth
Author:Melissa Cadzow
Source:Health Voices, Issue 2015, October 2014, 8p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:I have loved technology my whole life. My parents set up one of the early technology companies in the 1970’s, so like today’s kids, I’ve always had technology around me. My own technology business is 24 years old. So, naturally enough, as a consumer representative I have a particular interest in eHealth.
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon Doctors: It's time to connect
Author:Murkesh Haikerwal
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2014, 2p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:I have worked in general practice for over 20 years in the west of Melbourne. I came to the realisation that the work that I do, the accuracy of it, the necessity to manage the volume of information and to properly monitor the care of my patients can be greatly enhanced by using technology. Over the years general practice has evolved to a place where 98 per cent of GPs would use technology for clinical purposes.
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon If you suffer from a chronic illness, an eHealth record is important to you
Author:Steve Hambleton
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2014, 31 October 2014
Abstract:The difference eHealth can make to patient care is amply illustrated by the potential benefits to those with complex and chronic disease who need to see multiple providers.
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon Wanted: Strong Government support
Author:Catherine King
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2015, 7p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:It’s now been five months since an expert review of Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR) found that e-health records were a piece of critical national infrastructure.
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon Potential for benefits and risks to safety and quality
Author:Prashan Malalasekera
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2014, 11p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:The expansion of electronic health has been one of the defining narratives in healthcare provision over the past decade. “E-health” provides significant opportunities for enhanced consumer involvement in their healthcare. It is also cited as a crucial tool to tackle some of the most pressing challenges facing global health systems today: rising costs, chronic and complex disease management, and the information bottlenecks between healthcare providers in today’s health system.
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon Remember the vital allies of good healthcare
Author:Lin Oke
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2014, 12p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:The promise of the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record to allow consumers’ eHealth records to be shared between clinicians, between settings and between various clinical information and management systems is far from being achieved – unfortunately it is increasingly developing into an online medical record rather than a tool for multidisciplinary care and collaboration.
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon Breaking through the information barrier in healthcare
Author:Delia Scales
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2015, 4p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:As a retired nurse with a background in neurosurgery and intensive care, it was not until I got breast cancer that my eyes were truly opened to the cost and information barriers confronting health consumers.
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon The evolution we need now
Author:Adam Stankevicius
Source:Health Voices, Issue 15, October 2014, 1p, 31 October 2014
Abstract:It is at least 15 years since the federal and state governments began spending serious money on the development of a national eHealth system accessible by all Australians. Since then, more than $5 billion in taxpayers’ money has been spent on this project. Yet the goal of attaining a system that would transform not only the national delivery of healthcare but also the patient’s knowledge and influence in care decisions, remains some way off.
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon Keeping the health system universal without blowing the budget
Author:Adam Stankevicius
Source:CHF, 16 April 2014, 3p
Abstract:the striking feature that emerges from this Better Bang for your Buck issue of Health Voices is how many of the remedies to the malaise of Australia’s health system are essentially achievable. and there is a swelling mood for change.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Changing the script: curbing the cost of medicine by automating prescriptions by active ingredient
Author:David Baker
Source:CHF, 16 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:Leaving the doctor’s with a script is a common experience. In 2010 the Australian Bureau of Statistics reported that 81 per cent of GP visits by people aged 15 years and over resulted in patients leaving with a prescription. The Medical Journal of Australia also reported in 2010 that nearly 70 per cent of prescriptions are repeat prescriptions. However, the extra cost of a prescription on top of perhaps having just paid to see the doctor can be unwelcome – especially when we are sick.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Australian health and welfare funding: a review is timely
Author:Paul Gross
Source:CHF, 16 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:our health care system will generate national health expenditure of about $158 billion in 2014, roughly 10 per cent of GDP. this will be funded from our taxes, our private health insurance premiums, our uninsurable co-payments and our investments in companies that own hospitals and aged care facilities.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Change is imperative to end archaic practices
Author:Peter Dutton
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 1p
Abstract:the health of our health system has been a focus of national debate for several years now, but unfortunately to a large extent that is all it has been talk – there has been little genuine reform.
 
Title:pdf document icon Preserve Medicare to ensure value for our health dollars
Author:Catherine King
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:In February this year we celebrated the 30th anniversary of the commencement of Medicare. For millions of Australians there has never been anything but Medicare. Every Australian under 30 has grown up under a system of universal care, and it’s important to take that in context for what it has meant for health outcomes in Australia.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Let’s improve, not discourage, access to primary care
Author:Richard Di Natale
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:Spending on health as a proportion of GDP has increased only slightly over the last decade. Projections suggest we are on track to spend an additional one percent of GDP over the next decade. This small increase has little to do with unnecessary GP visits, as the Health Minister would have us believe, but is primarily the result of access to improving medical technology leading to better investigations and treatments. Far from being a crisis, the fact that we have new options that can help us live longer, healthier and more productive lives is something to celebrate. Would anyone actually prefer that Australians miss out on new and better therapies for serious diseases?
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Six steps to help preserve universal health care
Author:Stephen Leeder
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:Strange things happen: in the past three years health care costs have stopped rising at terrifying rates in the US (1). No one reason stands out; instead, economists suggest that industry, which has borne the heaviest burdens in costs because much private health insurance is paid for by employers, has applied pressure on insurers because of the general belt-tightening induced by the GFC. There has been much discussion in medical circles about ‘effectiveness research’ that provides intelligence on which investments in health care have the highest yields in health gains. Obamacare debates have sensitised the community and possibly heightened public awareness that ever more expensive care does not mean ever better health care.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Real people, real data and real solutions
Author:Deborah Smith and Sarah Spiller
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 1p
Abstract:Finding out what works, what doesn’t and where and how we can get a better bang for our buck starts with listening to what consumers can tell us – about the health system, health costs and health outcomes
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Needed reform in health care
Author:Stephen Duckett
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:Recent media commentary would have us believe that the health system is in dire straits. There have been claims it is unsustainable and that drastic change, such as compulsory co-payments, is necessary to slow cost growth. This scare-mongering, or ‘sustainability panic’, sets the scene for dramatic, regressive and unwarranted changes to our health system.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Putting people at the centre of their health care: practical approaches to more integrated care
Author:Christine Bennett
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:In Australia there are challenges in achieving comprehensive, connected care for people at the right place and time, due to the health system’s fractured governance (who is responsible) and financing (who pays). While many remain convinced that Commonwealth and state responsibilities must be reshaped toward a single national public funder, at one level of government or through pooled funding, we cannot wait for a new structure to drive integrated or connected care.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon A better health system for fewer dollars by embracing needed reforms
Author:John Dwyer
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:Medicare is so expensive and uncontrollable that it is financially unsustainable, say our Treasurer and Health Minister. Indeed they suggest that if we don’t rein in Medicare expenditure Australia will be bankrupt! We are told government spending must be curtailed everywhere, including Medicare where we currently spend about $18 billion each year.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Extending user-pays in Medicare
Author:Terry Barnes
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:Whatever you think of the proposal to allow a $6 co-payment for bulk billed GP services, the debate over Medicare and health care sustainability isn’t going away. The recent Fairfax Neilsen poll, showing surprisingly strong public support for user-pays measures to help keep Medicare fiscally manageable, indicates a community appetite to at least consider challenging and tough options hitherto banished to dark political corners.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon First steps to better value health care
Author:Jennifer Doggett
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:The debate about how much we should be spending on health care may never be resolved. However, one issue everyone can agree on is the importance of getting maximum value out of every dollar that we invest in our health system.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Beyond hospital walls— making the health dollar go further
Author:Alison Verhoeven
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:With health care costs continuing to rise, and hospitals struggling with increasing demand, there have been calls to overhaul the funding and governance structures in the Australian health system. With hospitals accounting for around 40 per cent of health expenditure in Australia, there is rightly a focus on how efficiently services are delivered, and the various models available for optimal service funding and delivery.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Memo ministers: why not direct Medicare funds to where they are needed?
Author:John Ferguson
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:Several years ago I received an analysis of the annual workforce survey conducted by my specialist college, the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP). In the practice of specialist internal medicine, it is widely acknowledged that there are great shortages of specialists in General Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine and Geriatrics. These are specialties under particular demand in the aging Australian population. At one level, one might say why not ensure that more people to take up these worthy roles? Unfortunately the workforce survey contained bad news- there were very few trainees proceeding into these disciplines- only 2 of 64 trainees. In contrast, 33 of the 64 had chosen to train in the procedural specialities of cardiology, gastroenterology, respiratory medicine and neurology all of which have more than adequate numbers of specialists.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Good health is good business
Author:Karen Howard
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:Health care is in many ways a business; in fact it is very big business. In our region, the Hunter, our Local Health District is our biggest employer. The organisation that I chair, Hunter Medicare Local, represents hundreds of clinicians who are also small business operators.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Life and death issues: how the dismal science can help
Author:Nicholas Graves
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:If Australians are to continue to enjoy high quality health care services things will have to change. In the last 10 years growth in health spending has averaged 6 per cent a year and this compares badly with a growth in GDP of 2.5 per cent a year. It’s not hard to see that spending habits need to be change. As governments and private insurers tighten their belts they must choose services that generate good health returns per dollar spent. Services that deliver zero or low health benefits per dollar spent might be reduced. Hard as it seems, we are facing the economic reality of scarce resources.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Empowered voices – patients, doctors, politicians - choosing wisely in health care
Author:Adam Elshaug
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:Scarcely a day passes without news flashing of Australia’s ‘unsustainable health care system’. Sustainability is a matter of pertinence, no question, but too often the 30 second news grabs focus overly on costs at the expense of an equally important element; quality of care. It’s not all about bucks, but achieving the best bang for the bucks invested. And, historically Australia has held an enviable record in this regard around the world. Our health care expenditure as a proportion of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) sits within the average for OECD nations, yet historically we have sat towards the top on performance and outcome measures. Staying near the top is not assured. We are told that only half of care delivered is in line with guidelines, one-third is thought to be waste, and much is not evidence-based1. With one eye on the short-medium term horizon, the challenge for Australia is to work collectively at holding near (or arguably rescuing) the tenets that once carried us to the status of a world-leading health care system (universality; equity; quality) while re-shaping those components that have lagged Australia’s changing health care needs (chronic and multi-morbidity; increasingly specialised and high-tech care; multiple siloed funders including federal, state, private health insurance, which complicates efforts at care coordination). What would just a few practical win-win ideas for reorienting the health care system look like?
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Tinkering is not enough to save Medicare
Author:Jeremy Sammut
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:It helps to think about the major challenges facing the Australian health system as a number of intersecting problems. The first problem is that Australian governments will struggle to fund the cost of Medicare as the population rapidly ages in coming decades.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Getting the right balance in Australia’s public and private health care system
Author:Terence Cheng and Anthony Scott
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:Australia maintains a unique mix of public and private involvement in financing and providing health care services. This mixed approach has allowed the system to strike the often hard balance between its objectives of promoting equitable access to care, cost efficiency and sustainability, and the responsiveness of the health system to individual needs.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Health care in The Netherlands – experiences from a natural experiment introducing a leading role for private insurance
Author:Chris Van Weel
Source:CHF, 15 April 2014, 2p
Abstract:in 2006 a reform of the Dutch health care system was implemented, under which single payer private health care insurance was introduced. the main objective of the reform was to introduce market mechanisms to reduce health care costs through insurers’ buying the best care for the lowest price for their insurees/patients. the reform was a major move from the health care system that had effectively been introduced in 1941, in which not-for-profit sick funds had been the main funders of health care.
Topic:Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Health Voices Issue 13 Oct 2013
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:CHF, 5 November 2013, 24p
Abstract:Edition focusing on Primary Care - issues, challenges and opportunities
Topic:Care in the community
 
Title:pdf document icon Health Voices, Issue 13, Oct 2013
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:CHF, 5 November 2013, 24p
Abstract:Primary Healthcare - issues, challenges and opportunities
Topic:Care in the community
 
Title:pdf document icon Providing dental care to those who need it most
Author:Dr Christine Bennett
Source:CHF, 1 May 2012, 2p
Abstract:Australians have a lot to smile about. A beautiful country,a strong currency,weather that’s as good as it gets and a dynamic multicultural society are all testament to our national good fortune. When it comes to health we enjoy long life expectancy, consumer choice through Medicare and private health insurance (PHI), and a health system ranked third in the world by the Commonwealth Fund. But when it comes to dental care the smile disappears – Australia has a health system ‘without teeth’. Public dental services can’t meet demand: it’s time to ask what role the private sector might play in filling the gaps in dental provision that leave many people without access to even the most basic services.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon It is time dental care became universal too
Author:Nicola Ballenden
Source:CHF, 1 May 2012, 2p
Abstract:Recently a young man, Brett, was referred to the Brotherhood of St Laurence by his job service provider. He couldn’t work because his impacted wisdom teeth kept getting infected so badly it made him ill and there was a 30 month wait for treatment at his local public dental health clinic. The job service provider had heard that the Brotherhood could help. Through a small philanthropic fund we were able to pay for private treatment and Brett is now actively looking for work.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon How State dental services can improve access for those most in need
Author:Dr Deborah Cole
Source:CHF, 1 May 2012, 2p
Abstract:In the past two years almost two million Australians who needed dental care were unable to access treatment because they couldn’t afford it. So what can State dental services do to improve access to dental services? An innovative, multi-strategy approach is needed if we are to make a real difference to the lives of disadvantaged Australians.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Building up the public sector dental workforce
Author:Mark Cormack
Source:CHF, 1 May 2012, 2p
Abstract:Access to appropriate and timely dental care and improving dental health for all Australians are two important topics that have been explored in a recently released report by the National Advisory Council on Dental Health, which is now being considered in more detail by the Australian Government.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon The road to universal dental care
Author:Senator Richard Di Natale
Source:CHF, 1 May 2012, 2p
Abstract:Australia’s oral health is a disgrace, and it is getting worse. The omission of the mouth from the health system is an increasingly glaring anomaly. While Medicare has its problems, it can only be regarded as a popular success. It’s time that the last gap was filled and Medicare covered the whole body. Universal dental care is an idea whose time has come.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Dentists shouldn’t be pawns in politics of care
Author:The Hon Peter Dutton MP
Source:CHF, 1 May 2012, 2p
Abstract:A great satisfaction of my job is meeting people who have had their quality of life immeasurably improved through successful policies. That has been especially evident with the Medicare Chronic Disease Dental Scheme (CDDS). Some eligible patients have not seen a dentist in years. They have severe dental health issues. They are suffering, in great pain and the situation is making their underlying medical condition even more difficult to manage.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Editorial
Author:Carol Bennett
Source:CHF, 1 May 2012, 1p
Abstract:CHF believes that something has gone badly wrong when you have nearly three quarters of a million Australians on a public waiting list. A massive number of Australians – particularly people on lower incomes – simply cannot access basic dental care at all. Australia clearly faces a hidden epidemic when it comes to accessing the public dental health system.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Real reform that will work – DentalAccess, not a universal dental scheme
Author:Dr Shane Fryer
Source:CHF, 1 May 2012, 2p
Abstract:The Australian Government’s focus on dental care provides an opportunity for all dental practitioners to suggest ideas for real reform. This debate about how dental care can be equitably and efficiently provided to all Australians is well overdue. In order to consider how this can be achieved, we need to understand how we have arrived to this point, and how the Australian Dental Association’s (ADA) proposal will ensure that people who are in most need of dental care will have access to quality treatment.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Dental care for the children and adults in greatest need
Author:Cassandra Goldie
Source:CHF, 1 May 2012, 2p
Abstract:While many people say they fear going to the dentist, it is more often the cost rather than the drill that causes the most pain. More than one-third of Australians say they put off going to the dentist because they cannot afford it.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Bringing dental care in from the cold
Author:Tony McBride
Source:CHF, 1 May 2012, 2p
Abstract:Health reform is a long-term enterprise and progress towards a more equitable consumerfriendly system is frustratingly slow, despite a few worthwhile changes in the last few years. Moving towards universal access to dental care would be a major step forward however and is long overdue.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Dental investment has to reach those who need it the most
Author:The Hon Tanya Plibersek MP
Source:CHF, 1 May 2012, 1p
Abstract:Whether it’s been improving how our hospitals are run, addressing the shortages of doctors, nurses and health professionals in regional areas, or making the largest ever investment in mental health services, we have taken the same, methodical and sound approach.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Directions for improving oral health and dental services for Australians
Author:Professor John Spencer
Source:CHF, 1 May 2012, 2p
Abstract:Australian children in the mid-1990s had among the best oral health in the world. Even with the deterioration seen across the last 15 years, the oral health of Australian children still ranks in the top tier of OECD countries. On a population basis, the need for treatment is manageable and costs for the coverage of five million children are considerable, but not as confronting as for adults. The cost for treatment per child is about one-third to one-quarter the cost for a concession card holder adult.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon How to make public dentistry work
Author:Associate Professor Hans Zoellner
Source:CHF, 1 May 2012, 2p
Abstract:State and Territory governments are responsible for delivering public dental services, but the national public dental waiting list hovers around 500,000. Especially daunting is that this figure underestimates actual demand because many who are eligible for public dentistry have no serious expectation of ever being seen, so don’t register for appointments.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Dental reform can’t be optional
Author:Anna Greenwood
Source:CHF, 1 May 2012, 3p
Abstract:The oral health of Australians is undoubtedly an area that requires urgent attention and reform. Affordability and access issues present major barriers to good oral health to a large proportion of the Australian population. Any activity that aims to address these barriers to access, and the inequalities that exist, is valuable.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon The Life Saving Drugs Program: What it means to consumers
Author:Linda Charlton
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 2p
Abstract:The Life Saving Drugs Program (LSDP) is vitally important to Australians suffering from rare and life-threatening illnesses as it ensures they have the same access to life-saving treatments as those suffering from more common conditions. It gives eligible patients access to life-saving drugs which do not meet the cost-effectiveness criteria for Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS)funding.
Topic:Health funding / Improving health and wellbeing / Medicines and medical devices
 
Title:pdf document icon When medicines harm: the DES experience and how we can avoid it happening again
Author:Carol Devine
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 2p
Abstract:Victims of DES are now at the mercy of those whose political agendas dictate that lifesaving information about DES be kept suppressed. To stop the DES tragedy happening again, we first need to bring DES information to the fore.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon Editorial
Author:Carol Bennett
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 1p
Abstract:There can be no doubt that safe, high-quality, affordable medicines are central to healthcare. Consumers rely on access to these medicines to maintain health, manage symptoms, improve quality of life or even keep them alive. This is why medicines policy has always been core business for CHF.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication / Medicines and medical devices
 
Title:pdf document icon Rare diseases: surviving the desert
Author:Megan Fookes
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 2p
Abstract:One could not begin to understand what it would be like for a patient with a rare disease to be told that there is treatment available to them but they cannot access it.
Topic:Health funding / Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication / Medicines and medical devices
 
Title:pdf document icon A consumer perspective on recent regulatory reviews
Author:Ken Harvey
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 2p
Abstract:Persistent consumer (and health professional) activism, with help from the media, has resulted in a plethora of consultations, reports and recommendations to which the Government must soon respond.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing / Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Government reviews of regulatory arrangements – what we hope to achieve
Author:The Hon Catherine King MP
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 2p
Abstract:… the Australian public should be afforded the highest standards for therapeutics regulation that can be achieved.
Topic:Medicines and medical devices / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumers and the advertising of therapeutic goods
Author:Judith Maher
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 2p
Abstract:It is in no one’s interest for dodgy operators to get away with duping consumers with essentially false advertising of items as important as medicines and health products simply because these products are considered to be at the “low risk” end of the medicines market.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing / Medicines and medical devices
 
Title:pdf document icon Medication safety and efficacy: achieving better health outcomes
Author:Alison Marcus
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 3p
Abstract:Consumers deserve a rigorous system of oversight that does not allow avoidance of regulatory requirements – or the potential for misunderstanding by consumers around different levels of regulation. Consumers simply need to know if a medicine has been tested for efficacy – or not.
Topic:Medicines and medical devices / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon Getting the whole picture – consumer participation in health policy
Author:Robert Pask
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 2p
Abstract:If policy is deficient because of lack of consumer input, it vastly reduces its chance of success across the whole health system, so it is something that the whole community needs to get right at the top.
Topic:Consumer participation / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon Ensuring vaccine safety
Author:Debra Petrys
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 1p
Abstract:By working together and ensuring greater involvement of consumers in decisions about policy change and vaccine delivery, high immunisation rates can be achieved.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving health and wellbeing / Medicines and medical devices
 
Title:pdf document icon Reflections on ten years as Chair of the PBAC
Author:Lloyd Sansom AO
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 2p
Abstract:The last ten years have seen considerable advances in increasing transparency and opportunities for consumers and others to input into the PBAC.
Topic:Medicines and medical devices / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon Partnerships and Policy: What has the National Medicines Policy achieved for consumers?
Author:Diane Walsh
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 2p
Abstract:Who is better placed to provide real life data about the true safety and effectiveness of medicines than the people who use them?
Topic:Consumer participation / Medicines and medical devices
 
Title:pdf document icon Medicines pricing, consumer access and sustainability
Author:Jo Watson
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 2p
Abstract:Sustainability is more than affordability, and what society deems as enduring and as worthy of protection is measured not only by community cost, but also by community benefit.
Topic:Medicines and medical devices / Health funding / Care in the community
 
Title:pdf document icon Instructions: an essential component of medication safety
Author:Anne McKenzie
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 2p
Abstract:Consumers say that the instruction labels on their prescription medicines telling them ‘how and when’ to take the medicines are an important part managing their health.
Topic:Medicines and medical devices / Improving health and wellbeing
Project:Community Quality Use of Medicines and Medical Tests (CQUM/MT) Project 2011-12
 
Title:pdf document icon Accessing innovation: consumers and clinical trials
Author:Denis Strangman
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 1p
Abstract:Genuine involvement in trial management and early involvement in the trial design itself are the next steps. Rather than seeing this as a threat,investigators and sponsors should see such involvement by consumers as adding real value to the whole process.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing / Consumer participation
Project:Consumer Guide to Clinical Trials
 
Title:pdf document icon Strategies to improve recruitment for clinical trials
Author:John Stubbs
Source:CHF, 31 October 2011, 1p
Abstract:As health consumers we are members of an august group of people and it is our job to promote and encourage access to clinical trials.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing / Consumer participation
Project:Consumer Guide to Clinical Trials
 
Title:pdf document icon Health Consumers Queensland: What we've achieved and where we're headed
Author:Paige Armstrong
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 2p
Abstract:Health Consumers Queensland was established by the Queensland Government following the Queensland Health System Review:Final Report September 2005 and subsequent state-wide consultation with health consumers, consumer and community organisations, statutory bodies and health professionals, around the need for a health consumer body in Queensland.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon From consumer to consumer representative
Author:Karen Carey
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 2p
Abstract:Being a consumer representative requires a combination of passion and a really thick skin – sometimes the greater the passion, the thicker the skin has to be. My passion comes from knowing that, with the right support, a single person can bring about meaningful change in the healthcare system.
Topic:Improving hospitals and health services / Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumers making a difference: the Sea Lake experience
Author:Bev Cook OAM
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 1p
Abstract:For a period of over four years, the Sea Lake Health Service requested assistance from the Federal Department of Health and Ageing, as well as the Victorian Department of Health, as its financial situation was declining.
Topic:Care in the community / Consumer participation / Health funding / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Why we needed a new health consumer peak body in NSW
Author:Sally Crossing AM
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 2p
Abstract:Until early 2011, NSW was the only Australian state or territory, except Tasmania and the Northern Territory, without a peak vehicle for the health consumer voice at the state level.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Editorial
Author:Carol Bennett
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 1p
Abstract:Consumers are more than recipients and funders of healthcare. They are essential partners – like it or not. To treat consumers otherwise is to both miss an opportunity for optimising healthcare delivery, and to court misunderstanding, ‘non-compliance’ and compromised self-management.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Breaking down barriers: the importance of Aboriginal consumer engagement
Author:Laura Elkin
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 2p
Abstract:The Health Consumers Council WA's Aboriginal Consumer Participation Program employs two Aboriginal staff members who have been travelling the state since 2006 to listen to Aboriginal people’s experiences and views about accessing health services; promoting consumer health rights; and hosting forums for consumers and services to come together.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Two perspectives on consumer representation: the experience of the Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council
Author:Janne Graham AM
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 3p
Abstract:At the first meeting of APAC, Minister Staples emphasised the centrality of the consumer in the development of health policy and highlighted the concept of “quality use of medicines” as a central concern for consumers.
Topic:Consumer participation / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumers driving health research
Author:Kathleen Griffiths
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 2p
Abstract:Active participation in research is a process whereby the consumer is involved in one, several or all of the research processes, including setting research priorities and questions, designing the research and the associated protocols, collecting, analysing and interpreting the data, writing up and disseminating the research findings.
Topic:Consumer participation / Research and new technologies
 
Title:pdf document icon Providing a global voice for patients
Author:Joanna Groves
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 2p
Abstract:The International Alliance of Patients’ Organizations(IAPO) is a global alliance of over 200 organisations representing patients of all nationalities across all disease areas and promoting patient-centred healthcare around the world.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon The value of consumer participation to the Department of Health and Ageing
Author:Jane Halton PSM
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 2p
Abstract:From birth to death, all Australians are health consumers. For that reason we are all direct or indirect clients of the Department of Health and Ageing.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Engaging with young people: the Youth Future Crew
Author:Toni van Hamond PSM
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 2p
Abstract:This article presents some of the learnings from our youth participation program at headspace Barwon.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Partnerships with patients
Author:Karen Luxford
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 2p
Abstract:In this age of changing healthcare expectations, how do you ensure that patients are recognised as integral “care team members”?
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumer and community participation in health research
Author:Anne McKenzie
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 2p
Abstract:Creating opportunities for consumers and community members to have a ‘voice’ at all levels and in all stages of health research has been the driving force behind the consumer and community engagement program at the University of Western Australia’s School of Population Health and then the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving hospitals and health services / Research and new technologies
 
Title:pdf document icon Changing perspectives on consumer involvement in mental health
Author:Janet Meacgher AM
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 1p
Abstract:Consumer activism arising from the deinstitutionalisation era (1970-1989) was driven by the need for advocacy and rights awareness and protection.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving health and wellbeing / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumers and health reform
Author:The Hon Nicola Roxon MP
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 3p
Abstract:Putting the patient at the centre of health service delivery is easy to say, but much harder to do.
Topic:Consumer participation / Health funding / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon The value of consumer participation to Industry
Author:Brendan Shaw
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 2p
Abstract:Consumer participation along the continuum of new medicine development is critical in terms of achieving positive health benefits for all Australians.
Topic:Consumer participation / Medicines and medical devices
 
Title:pdf document icon Senator Rachel Siewert
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 3p
Abstract:It may – or may not – surprise many to know that some Senators spend significantly more time in Senate Committees than they do in the Senate itself.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Building consumer capacity: the Our Health, Our Community Project
Author:Kate Moore
Source:CHF, 1 July 2011, 2p
Abstract:Fostering this connectivity is a challenge for the consumer movement. It is the focus of a new project for CHF – the Our Health, Our Community Project.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Vibrant, productive rural communities are integral to the long-term sustainability of Australia
Author:Margaret Brown AM
Source:Health Voices, April 2010, Issue 6, 20 April 2010, 2p
Abstract:It is critical that people who live and work in rural and remote Australia have access to high quality, relevant and affordable healthcare, education, training and social support at all ages and stages of life.
Topic:Older people / Information and communication / Improving hospitals and health services / Improving health and wellbeing / Health funding / Equity in health / Care in the community
 
Title:pdf document icon Keep governments honest on health
Author:John Daye OAM
Source:Health Voices, April 2010, Issue 6, 20 April 2010, 2p
Abstract:It’s time to keep governments accountable, de-politicise health, tie taxes to specific funding and ensure minorities are not marginalised.
Topic:Health funding / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumers as critical friends – a different perspective on quality
Author:Russell McGowan
Source:Health Voices, April 2010, Issue 6, 20 April 2010, 2p
Abstract:Consumers can add essential value to continuous quality improvement processes; listen to them as partners who want to help improve outcomes and ensure we get the most benefit from health spending.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving hospitals and health services / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon Bucking the health reform debate
Author:Michael Janssen
Source:Health Voices, April 2010, Issue 6, 20 April 2010, 2p
Abstract:Health reform without clear mechanisms for consumer involvement needs to be challenged.
Topic:Consumer participation / Health funding / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon Now for an Intervention we’d like to see
Author:John Paterson
Source:Health Voices, April 2010, Issue 6, 20 April 2010, 2p
Abstract:Reform aimed at funding and developing clinical and social practice that is founded on a strong and central commitment to comprehensive primary health care should be a key priority.
Topic:Health funding / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon How would you like health dollars allocated? A family’s journey through the health system
Author:Diana Aspinall
Source:Health Voices, April 2010, Issue 6, 20 April 2010, 3p
Abstract:Access to coordinated local services should be at the core of our health system.
Topic:Care in the community / Equity in health / Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Big issues, small voices
Author:Lif O'Connor
Source:Health Voices, April 2010, Issue 6, 20 April 2010, 2p
Abstract:‘The destiny of any nation at any time depends on the opinion of its young people, those under twenty-five.’ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Topic:Consumer participation / Equity in health / Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Advanced Care Planning and Palliative Care
Author:Coral Rizzalli OAM
Source:Health Voices, April 2010, Issue 6, 20 April 2010, 2p
Abstract:Taking the guesswork out of end of life decision-making is one way to spend our health dollars wisely, and use palliative care health resources to meet consumer need.
Topic:Care in the community / Health funding / Improving hospitals and health services / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon Public versus individual benefit – a moral dilemma
Author:Karen Carey
Source:Health Voices, April 2010, Issue 6, 20 April 2010, 2p
Abstract:Is cost/benefit analysis the fair way to decide who will get what in our healthcare system?
Topic:Care in the community / Health funding / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon Excluded from the table: LGBT health and wellbeing
Author:Gabi Rosenstreich
Source:Health Voices, April 2010, Issue 6, 20 April 2010, 3p
Abstract:Targeted efforts are required to ensure that the voices of marginalised groups are heard.
Topic:Care in the community / Consumer participation / Health funding / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon The ageing of the post-war migrants: a challenge for health promotion and service delivery
Author:Pino Migliorino
Source:Health Voices, April 2010, Issue 6, 20 April 2010, 3p
Abstract:Issues faced by our culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities must be central, not marginal, to planning, funding and implementing a better health system for Australia.
Topic:Care in the community / Consumer participation / Health funding / Older people
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumer input into health reform: lessons from other countries
Author:Jennifer Doggett
Source:Health Voices, April 2010, Issue 6, 20 April 2010, 3p
Abstract:Reform in health should start with fundamental questions about what the community values, and what role consumers should play in decision making.
Topic:Care in the community / Consumer participation / Health funding / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon Editorial
Author:Carol Bennett
Source:Health Voices, April 2010, Issue 6, 20 April 2010, 1p
Abstract:We live in a time of challenge, opportunity and reform - especially in the area of health and wellbeing.
Topic:Care in the community / Consumer participation / Health funding / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon Addressing depression and anxiety in rural and remote areas
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:There is growing consensus that depression and anxiety affect people from all walks of life in modern society, but there remains a lack of awareness of the unique challenges encountered by those living in rural and remote areas of Australia.
Topic:Equity in health / Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon beyondblue: the national depression initiative
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:Depression and anxiety disorders account for more years of disability and lost productivity in Australia than any other illness. The challenge is large, but work is in progress. There’s much to be done, and major attitudinal barriers to overcome.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon The 4th National Mental Health Plan: what does it mean for consumers?
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:CHF, 1 October 2009
Abstract:The 4th National Mental Health Plan is currently under development. The draft is presented as a plan for treating, supporting and enhancing well-being for people with a mental illness and those at risk of developing mental illness and mental disorder, demonstrating a comprehensive ‘whole of government’ approach. CHF member, the Mental Health Coordinating Council, NSW, says that while some mental health literacy actions are identified, it falls short of being a Plan that will achieve objectives for the population-at-large.
Topic:Consumer participation / Health funding / Improving health and wellbeing / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Chronic conditions and depression— investigating the links
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:Links between depression, anxiety and other chronic conditions has major implications for individuals, our community and our health system.
Topic:Health professionals / Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumer voice on mental health issues
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:CHF, 1 October 2009
Abstract:Health policy and program development works better when consumers are partners. Consultation is underway to inform what an eagerly awaited mental health consumer peak organisation should look like. Meanwhile, a national voice for consumers and carers is facilitated by the National Mental Health Consumer and Carer Forum.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon Caring and mental health: no small issue
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:There are 2.6 million unpaid family carers across Australia, many of whom are under enormous stress as they hold the nation’s health system together. This continuing strain has been shown to place carers themselves at higher risk of injury, depression and mental illness. It’s time to ensure carers are effectively supported.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon Depression and anxiety in the CALD Community
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:Understanding cultural barriers is the first step in recognising how depression can be treated in the CALD community.
Topic:Equity in health / Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon Facing dialysis, depression and anxiety
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:Life is difficult and the wait for transplant can seem hopeless for people on dialysis.
Topic:Equity in health / Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon Health care access for people with a mental illness: then and now
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:Much has changed over the past 30 years for those experiencing mental illness. Yet the need remains to find supportive mental health care providers to coordinate care, be there for the long haul, and believe that the person can recover.
Topic:Equity in health / Improving health and wellbeing / Improving hospitals and health services / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon The Mental Health and Insurance Project: focusing on consumers
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:For many years mental health consumers have raised difficulties in accessing insurance or making a claim. Life insurance has been highlighted, though issues also arise with other forms of insurance, particularly travel insurance.
Topic:Equity in health / Health funding / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon Mental health in the workplace
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:Mental illness is to the 21st century workplace what physical industrial diseases like silicosis were to the 19th and early 20th centuries. And just as some occupations in that era were more hazardous than others when it came to exposing people to disease, so it is today. We need, as a community to recognise this historical comparison. Over time through enlightened government, union and employer leadership we have reduced physical workplace illness, but we must now tackle those of the mind.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon Mibbinbah - an initiative for Indigenous men
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:Mibbinbah is a proactive research program taking steps to address depression and anxiety, and improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men by creating 'safe spaces'. Indigenous Men's Sheds/Spaces nurture social connection and personal empowerment.
Topic:Consumer participation / Equity in health / Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon Peer education makes a difference for older Australians
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:'beyond maturityblues' is a peer education success story, building and utilising community capacity to raise awareness and increase knowledge of depression for older Australians. It presents strategies to minimise risks associated with the illness, and works to reduce the stigma often associated with it, particularly in the over 50s age group.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication / Older people
 
Title:pdf document icon People with disabilities
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:Social interaction is a very important part of living a fulfilling life. We must work harder at ensuring disability, depression and anxiety is not experienced behind closed doors, and that all Australians can share their abilities and take their place in our community.
Topic:Equity in health / Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon The power of blueVoices
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:blueVoices gives people who have personal experience of depression, anxiety and related disorders and their carers the opportunity to share their needs and experiences and thus shape the opinions of policy makers and service providers across Australia.
Topic:Consumer participation / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon Quality use of medicine
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:Prescribe the person, not just the pill.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication / Medicines and medical devices
 
Title:pdf document icon Retrenchment and job loss
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:There is a great need for society to recognise that people who are retrenched, at any stage of their working lives, may experience anxiety and depression as a result. There remains, however, a strange reluctance to address the issue as part of an overall understanding that the discarding of people from employment carries with it an increased likelihood that those affected will develop significant and potentially long-term mental health issues.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon The Well-Being Agenda
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:The 2009 Grace Groom Lecture delivered by Professor Geoff Gallop AC, calls for a \'stronger emphasis on early intervention and prevention, better access to treatment where it matters, in the community, and more concern for the social, environmental and economic forces that affect our well-being\'.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon youthbeyondblue
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:HealthVoices, 1 October 2009
Abstract:It is extremely difficult for young people experiencing depression, as they may feel lost and a sense of hopelessness, especially when they do not know where to begin searching for help. It is crucial that they take that first step to recovery and see a doctor early on.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving health and wellbeing / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon Editorial - Health care in the best interests of children
Author:Penny Gibson
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:This issue of Health Voices gives voice to a small smattering of the health issues that face children and young people.
Topic:Improving hospitals and health services / Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Title: Maternity services review increases options for consumers
Author:Penny Gibson
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:CHF has welcomed the Commonwealth Government review in Australia's maternity services, part of the development of a National Maternity Services Plan.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving hospitals and health services
Project:Chronic Conditions Self Management 2008-10
 
Title:pdf document icon Creating different strokes
Author:Sarah Cullen
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:Sarah Cullen is a young consumer representative who established a health consumer organisation to support other young stroke survivors.
Topic:Consumer participation
Project:Chronic Conditions Self Management 2008-10
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumers help young people make the transition
Author:Lynne Brodie
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:Transition programs help young people with chronic conditions make the change from paediatric health care to the adult health system.
Topic:Consumer participation
Project:Chronic Conditions Self Management 2008-10
 
Title:pdf document icon Living with diabetes
Author:Tessie Laracy
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:As if it isn't hard enough to live with the physical manifestations of diabetes, many adolescents also have mental health issues related to the condition.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Reaching into the community
Author:Christine Minchin
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:A successful Tasmanian program uses peer education in communities to promote long-term changes to benefit health and well-being.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
Project:Chronic Conditions Self Management 2008-10
 
Title:pdf document icon A growing problem - Children with a mental illness or mental disorder
Author:Alexandra Rivers
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:A rising incidence of mental health illnesses in children and young people highlights the imperative for better information, more resources, more mental health professionals and more research into diagnosis and treatment.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
Project:Chronic Conditions Self Management 2008-10
 
Title:pdf document icon ADHD medicine - Making the choice
Author:Janet Hutchison
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:There is much confusion and controversy around the use of ADHD medicines.
Topic:Medicines and medical devices
Project:Chronic Conditions Self Management 2008-10
 
Title:pdf document icon Young, homeless people respond to co-ordinated care
Author:Penny Gibson
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:Adelaide's Streetlink Youth Health Service offers an integrated model of care that meets the complex health needs of homeless young people.
Topic:Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Caring for young carers
Author:Natalie Tolley and Annemarie Ashton
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:Young carers need to juggle their caring responsibilities with their need for education, friends and a social life.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Think pregnancy - think immunisation
Author:Hailey Shaw
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:It's an important for adults to keep up their immunisation as it is to ensure babies and children are immunised, particularly as whooping cough makes a comeback.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumers as providers - donations that save children's lives
Author:Russell McGowan
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:We need to increase the number of people willing to be donors and be more efficient in our collection and use of donated blood, tissue and organs.
Topic:Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Palliative care for children
Author:Jenny Hynson
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:Access to palliative care for children is hampered by its association with death, but it can be a component of treatment that helps children and their families 'hope for the best, prepare for the worst'.
Topic:Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Stillbirth: Striving to explain the unexplained
Author:David Ellwood and Vicki Flenady
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:With six babies a day being stillborn in Australia, much research needs to be done to find answers.
Topic:Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Consider the family
Author:Liz Conway
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:The Stillbirth and Neo-natal Death Support (SANDS)Qld has been providing support for bereaved parents and their families for over 25 years. The philosophy of parents helping parents is one that has proven supportive for many Australian parents.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon A diversity of views
Author:Sharon Chalmers
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:A recent study of the diverse cultural contexts in which children, their families and staff communicate with paediatric health care finds improvements are needed.
Topic:Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Improving the hospital journey
Author:Penny Gibson
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:The journey of families with extremely sick children can be improved through good communication, parents' knowledge of the system, and teamwork.
Topic:Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Forum
Author:Janney Wale, Kelly Kljajic, Jeff Wearne, Darlene Cox
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 4
Abstract:These short opinion pieces have been submitted by members and friends of CHF. They look at consumer representation, caring in the CALD community, rural sustainability and step-up/step-down facilities.
Topic:Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Editorial - Consumers shaping health for 21 years
Author:Penny Gibson
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:CHF celebrates the achievements of health consumers over the last 21 years.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon The future looks bright for CHF
Author:Antonio Russo
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:CHF Chairperson celebrates consumer participation.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Health Minister helps CHF celebrate 21 years
Author:Penny Gibson
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:The Minister for Health and Ageing Nicola Roxon speech to the CHF celebration of 21 years of consumer contributions to national policy.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Celebrate, challenge and change
Author:Sheila Rimmer AM
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:'Celebrate, challenge and change' was the theme of the CHF 21st birthday celebrations.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon CHF begins
Author:Philippa Smith
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:CHF came into being because consumers wanted the consumer voice to balance the voices of health professionals, bureaucrats and other health service providers.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Sustained consumer action on medicines brings political change
Author:Mary Murray
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:CHF has had a profound, ongoing effect on medicines policy in Australia dating back to its beginnings in 1987. The role of many people needs to be celebrated for this achievement.
Topic:Consumer participation / Medicines and medical devices / Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Celebrate consumer leadership in health
Author:Kate Moore
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:Consumer leadership is a vital ingredient of effective health reform. Because consumer organisations lead through both governance and guidance, they can bridge the gap between consumers and bureaucracy to make effective change.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Health rights for all
Author:Kathy Kendell
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:In July 2008, Australia's health ministers approved the Australian Charter of Health Rights. The true test of success for the Charter will be the extent to which it can improve health outcomes for our society's most disadvantaged.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving hospitals and health services / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon Birthday identifies challenges
Author:CHF staff
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:While health consumers have much to celebrate, there are still many challenges remaining to shape the Australian health care system into the best in the world - and the best for consumers.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Using the past to strengthen the future
Author:Mitch Messer
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:CHF has been very successful in the last two decades, but faces new challenges resulting from these successes. Lessons from the past are essential tools in developing strategies for addressing the future.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon How can CHF better meet members' needs
Author:Michele Kosky
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:A member organisation throws the challenge to CHF to find ways to better meet its members' needs and reflect the concerns and perspectives of a wider range of consumers.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Respect for the consumer experience
Author:Sally Crossing AM
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:CHF makes a positive difference to health because it has the practical expertise around the participation of health consumers and consumer representatives.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon The CHF approach
Author:Helen Hopkins
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:CHF needs and wants to hear the voices of our members so we can influence national health programs effectively. To achieve this, CHF has developed a consultation model that builds on the strength of consumers and their trust in CHF to represent them fairly and strongly.
Topic:Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Position Statement - Medical technologies and devices
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:This policy statement outlines how consumers want technologies and devices to be approved and funded for use in Australia and, once in use, how they are monitored for safety and effectiveness.
Topic:Medicines and medical devices / Research and new technologies / Improving hospitals and health services / Regulatory issues
 
Title:pdf document icon Forum
Author:Geraldine Robertson, Sue Lockwood, Bruce Campbell
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 3
Abstract:These short opinion pieces have been submitted by members and friends of CHF. We welcome feedback from readers on these Forum articles, as well as the other journal articles.
Topic:Medicines and medical devices / Health professionals / Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Editorial - Reform in health care
Author:Penny Gibson
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 2
Abstract:This issue of Health Voices presents a number of health reforms sought by different sectors of the health system. Each article looks at how the reform will impact on consumers.
Topic:Improving hospitals and health services / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon Vale Christopher Newell AM
Author:Consumers Health Forum of Australia
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 2
Abstract:It is with great sadness that we farewell Governing Committee member Rev Dr Christopher Newell AM, who died in Hobart in June.
Topic:Honours and memorials
 
Title:pdf document icon What consumers want from reform
Author:Helen Hopkins
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 2
Abstract:The need for reform in health care is not new. What is new is the urgent imperative for reform. Consumers have an opportunity to join the reform discussions as the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission makes its deliberations and recommendations.
Topic:Improving hospitals and health services / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon E-health is a valuable tool
Author:Catherine Ellis
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 2
Abstract:As the e-health movement continues to gain momentum across Australia, consumers are playing a greater part in driving the e-health direction to meet consumer needs.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving hospitals and health services / Equity in health
 
Title:pdf document icon E-medication saves lives and costs
Author:Prue Power
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 2
Abstract:A national electronic medication system will improve safety and quality in the health system, with subsequent reductions in adverse events and efficiencies for hospitals.
Topic:Electronic health information / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Listen to consumers to avoid mistakes
Author:Jenni Howlett
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 2
Abstract:Should a patient have to die before mistakes and near-misses are investigated? Mistakes are being made in our hospitals daily but most are not picked up by the current safety and quality system. We need to change that.
Topic:Improving hospitals and health services / Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Reform must listen to seniors
Author:Ian Yates AM
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 2
Abstract:Any health policy for older people must commit to fighting ageism. It must establish systems where older people continue to optimise their health and wellbeing as they age, preferably in their community but with access to specialist care in the community, hospitals and aged care facilities as necessary.
Topic:Older people / Consumer participation / Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Safety and quality must involve consumers
Author:Chris Baggoley
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 2
Abstract:The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care is already contributing to the reform process through its workplan's nine programs. The Commission works with consumers as a major stakeholder in improving safety and quality in health care.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon More focus needed on prevention and primary care
Author:Lesley Russell
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 2
Abstract:Without a focus on prevention and primary care, there will be no real changes to health outcomes and equity of access to health care. Funding is only part of the answer.
Topic:Health funding / Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Nurse practitioners must be part of the reform
Author:Karen Cook, Denise Ryan, Rowena Robinson, Christine Ashley
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 2
Abstract:Nurse practitioners have the potential to contribute to a reformed health system to make that system more flexible and more accessible. Reform must facilitate the entry of nurse practitioners into the health system.
Topic:Health professionals
 
Title:pdf document icon Towards a seamless health system
Author:Tony Hobbs
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 2
Abstract:The Australian General Practice Network calls for a health system that supports patients to access the care, resources and information they need, and encourages prevention of illness and management of chronic conditions.
Topic:Improving hospitals and health services / Health funding
 
Title:pdf document icon Remove the silos
Author:Paul Mackey
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 2
Abstract:The Australian Private Hospitals Association calls for health care reforms to dismantle the silos around the provision of health care.
Topic:Health funding / Improving hospitals and health services
 
Title:pdf document icon Reform must meet special needs
Author:Merle Thompson
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 2
Abstract:Many people with chronic conditions find the current health care system does not give them the best outcomes. Yet seemingly simple measures improve their quality of living. The Post Polio Network (NSW) story exemplifies this and calls for reforms that increase knowledge and support for people with Post-Polio Syndrome.
Topic:Consumer participation / Improving health and wellbeing
 
Title:pdf document icon Forum
Author:Janne D Graham AM, Frank Fisher, Clive Deverall
Source:Health Voices, 1 September 2008, Issue 2
Abstract:These short opinion pieces have been submitted by members and friends of CHF. We welcome feedback from readers on these Forum articles, as well as the other journal articles.
Topic:Medicines and medical devices / Health professionals / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon Health Voices helps consumers shape health in Australia
Author:Penny Gibson
Source:Health Voices, 1 August 2007, Issue 1
Abstract:This first issue of Health Voices seeks to raise some of the ethical issues that exist in Australia today for health consumers.
Topic:Consumer participation / Research and new technologies
 
Title:pdf document icon Consumer participation in research
Author:Helen Hopkins
Source:Health Voices, 1 August 2007, Issue 1
Abstract:Many health consumers and health professionals think about ethics in terms of ethics committees and clinical trials. This first issue of Health Voices takes us far beyond this narrow scope. However, it is also important to look at the role of health consumers in research, and the CHF role.
Topic:Research and new technologies / Consumer participation
 
Title:pdf document icon Australian Health Ethics Committee
Author:Sharon Caris
Source:Health Voices, 1 August 2007, Issue 1
Abstract:As scientific research expands its horizons, the ethical challenges are wide ranging and complex for all stakeholders, particularly where research involves people. The Australian Health Ethics Committee has an important role to guide research to protect individuals and the greater populace.
Topic:Research and new technologies
 
Title:pdf document icon The unfolding adventure
Author:Martin Robinson
Source:Health Voices, 1 August 2007, Issue 1
Abstract:As we continue to unravel the human genome, the potential for ethical - and unethical - uses of the resulting discoveries increases. How do we harness this knowledge?
Topic:Research and new technologies / Privacy and personal health information
 
Title:pdf document icon Privacy and genetic information
Author:Sharon Van der Laan
Source:Helth Voices, 1 August 2007, Issue 1
Abstract:When a person is diagnosed with a genetic condition, where does their right to privacy and their family's right to know begin?
Topic:Privacy and personal health information / Research and new technologies
 
Title:pdf document icon Too young for aged care
Author:Joy Mallett
Source:Health Voices, 1 August 2007, Issue 1
Abstract:People with Younger Onset Dementia have special needs. In particular, it's wrong at many levels for them to be housed in aged care residences.
Topic:Equity in health
 
Title:pdf document icon Post-coma unresponsiveness
Author:Michele Kosky
Source:Health Voices, 1 August 2007, Issue 1
Abstract:Consumer involvement in the development of guidelines for caring for people in post-coma unresponsiveness has led to a clear document that addresses the ethical issues associated with making decisions for people unable to make them for themselves.
Topic:Research and new technologies / Information and communication
 
Title:pdf document icon Making decisions for end of life
Author:Professor Margaret O'Connor AM and Bruce Shaw
Source:Health Voices, 1 August 2007, Issue 1
Abstract:If we want control over how we die, we need advance directives and open communication with our family and health practitioners.
Topic:Older people / Privacy and personal health information
 
Title:pdf document icon Keep quality improvement ethical
Author:Dea Thiele and Dr Sophie Couzos
Source:Health Voices, 1 August 2007, Issue 1
Abstract:As the line between quality improvement activities and research blur, do we need to change the guidelines about ethics committee approval? Aboriginal community controlled health services provide a case in point.
Topic:Research and new technologies
 
Title:pdf document icon Ethics around organ donation
Author:Chris Thomas
Source:Health Voices, 1 August 2007, Issue 1
Abstract:As donations remain stagnant and need increases, what are the ethical issues that we, as a society, face around organ transplants.
Topic:Privacy and personal health information / Equity in health / Research and new technologies
 
Title:pdf document icon Keeping consumer e-health transparent
Author:Bernard Kealey
Source:Health Voices, 1 August 2007, Issue 1
Abstract:Ethics is central to the culture of health provision in Australia; however, when it comes to looking at e-health things can get a bit clouded. This article looks at just one aspect of e-health, consumer sponsored and run websites.
Topic:Electronic health information
 
Title:pdf document icon Talk with me, not to me
Author:Jonathon Marshall
Source:Health Voices, 1 August 2007, Issue 1
Abstract:Health care professionals have an ethical responsibility to include people in the management of their own health care. Good communication is essential to this, particularly for people with chronic conditions.
Topic:Information and communication / Care in the community
 
Title:pdf document icon Forum
Author:Melissa Sweet, Antonio Russo, Sally Crossing AM, Sue Lockwood
Source:Health Voices, 1 August 2007, Issue 1
Abstract:These short opinion pieces have been submitted by members and friends of CHF. We welcome feedback from readers on these Forum articles, as well as the other journal articles. We also welcome Forum articles on health reform for our next issue.
Topic:Consumer participation